EVERYTHING WE THINK

Do you actually know what, 'you on a good day', feels like? Do you have to think back to the dim and distant past? Is the feeling of overwhelm all too familiar to you? Are you always looking over your shoulder waiting to be caught out or forever trying to measure up to others expectations? Can you remember the last time you congratulated yourself for a good job well done? More likely you're caught up in the current drama whilst endlessly berating yourself in all possible ways for the last time you failed; when did we become so cruel?


EVERYTHING WE SAY

So what are you saying to those around you? What decisions and promises are you making? Do you ever walk away from a conversation wondering what just happened and why you've taken on an extra burden when you're only just managing your existing workload? Have you ever agreed to something for a 'quiet life' only to have it come back and bite you further down the line? Do people hear you when you say no? Do you even know how to do that? How we communicate with people has a direct effect on our resilience, it's not just about what we're saying but equally important to learn and understand the why.


EVERYTHING WE DO

We all know about healthy food, exercise and getting enough sleep and how awful we feel when we overdo things. Those moments when we need to be on top form and it seems our bodies let us down; a cold which won't shift, the need for a physio and did I mention the constant tiredness?  So many physical factors affect our levels of resilience it's difficult to know where to start when our lives are so busy and demanding. However, it's not just about what we do, even the perfectly physical specimens amongst us fall prey to poor resilience, that's just one side of the triangle.

 

I've 'been there and done that' and have all the T shirts to prove it, I used to think I was the only one, too ashamed to share, convinced that I was failing in some way whilst all around me seemingly thriving. An expert on comparing my insides to everyone else's outsides little knowing that I too was on the receiving end of that game and I knew how to put on a very good outside. I share how it was for me and what I learned along the way.

Louise has an infectious optimism and ‘can do’ attitude to everything she does. She speaks from the heart, with a genuine desire to share her experiences in order to inspire others to take on new challenges and grow both individually and in their businesses.
— Richard Tidswell, Business Doctor

 

So What's Your Story Of Personal Resilience? What Works For You? What Do You Need To Be On A Good Day, Everyday.

Insomnia and constant fatigue yet unable to switch off or to escape that wired feeling. Stomach churning anxiety, rising fear and panic when plans were changed or spontaneity was expected and always, always, impatient and frustrated with myself.

It wasn't supposed to be like this, I was trying so hard to keep everything under control, not be found out, to 'get it right' and keep everyone in my life happy. I remember how sensitive and defensive I became, blaming everyone and everything when things went wrong and flying off the handle at the slightest provocation. I cringingly remember spending too much time shouting at those I loved. 

And that was me everyday, I was running on empty, no reserves and certainly no resilience - something had to give, there had to be another way

And so I started to question my behaviour and discover what went wrong and how to put it right. Over many years I've developed my Personal Resilience Trilogy of thought, word and deed; we determine our personal resilience levels in everything we think, say and do. I've developed tools and techniques to share with anyone who's had enough and wants to be on a good day, everyday.

I found your presentation delightful and set me soul searching as I
recognised so much of me in what you talked about.
Your talk was as much about sticks as businesses but totally relevant and your honesty and awareness of your experience and the impact on yourself and your life was very helpful.
— Shelagh Hetreed